6 things to do in Udawalawe – Elephants, Wildlife, and Nature

An unique mix of history, nature and wildlife! Are you thirsty for a taste of Africa while visiting Sri Lanka? Udawalawe is the place for you! The Udawalawe National Park was established in 1972 and extends to 30,821 hectares. Before becoming a National Park, the area was used for chena farming. The farmers have since moved on, because of the declaration of the importance of the national park. The Udawalawe National Park has often been compared to the savannah reserves of Africa, due to the sprawling grasslands with herds of elephants, water buffalo, leopards, and sambar deer. Udawalawe lies on the boundary of Sri Lanka’s wet and dry zones. Plains dominate the topography, though there are also some mountainous areas. Udawalawe Reservoir is located in the center of the park, and is fed by the Walawe Ganga River. Most tourists flock to the park to see the elephants herds of over 100. The elephants remain in the park because of a fence that keeps them protected inside. Many species of large water birds frequent the park, making it a popular bird watching location.

Things to Do

1. Wildlife Safari 

Image of Wildlife in Udawalawe national park
Wildlife in Udawalawe national park | Source:  ProMedia Sudath/Shutterstock.com

Udawalawe National Park is known as one of the best National Parks in Sri Lanka to see wild elephants. In the border of the southern province, it shares an elephant corridor with Lunugamwehera National Park. Also, with a few tanks inside the park, Udawalawe has a high density of birds during the migratory season. There are records of elusive leopards in this park, as well. Due to the shyness of the leopards, it is hard to find a one in the park remises. But if you have a stroke of luck, jungle cats are the best animal to see after elephants in Udawalwe National Park. The local communities are conducting safari drives in specially designed jeeps. Morning safaris are starting by 6 AM and could stay inside the park for about three hours. As most of the animals get active during the dawn and dusk, it is a great time to visit a National Park. For evening safari, you can start around 3 PM and stay until 6 PM. The park is open only between 6-6, but if you prefer staying inside the park, they have a campsite inside the park. You can directly book a campsite by visiting the website for the department of wildlife conservation. 

Image of Asian elephant in Udawalawe National Park Sri Lanka
Asian elephant in Udawalawe National Park Sri Lanka | Source: Paula French/Dreamstime.com
Image of Elephants in Udawalawe National Park
Elephants in Udawalawe National Park | Source:  sbedaux/Shutterstock.com
Image of Safari jeeps at Kawudulla national park
Safari jeeps at national park | Source:  shutterlk/Shutterstock.com

Image of hornbill anthracoceros coronatus in udawalawe national park
hornbill anthracoceros coronatus in udawalawe national park | Source:  EMJAY SMITH/Shutterstock.com

2. Elephant Transit Home

Image of Three elephants in udawalawe National Park sri lanka
Three elephants in udawalawe National Park sri lanka | Source:  Rob Den Braasem/Dreamstime.com

Udwalawe elephant transit home is one of the best places to visit in Sri Lanka to see the rehabilitation process of wild elephants. It is a part of conservation efforts done by the Sri Lankan wildlife department. When they find injured baby elephants or lost baby elephants in the wild, they take care of them in the transit home. Since this is close to the Udawalawe National Park, most elephants being rehomed to the National Park once they could live by themselves. The transit home keeps a collar for those elephants getting back to bushes and checks on them more often in their new home. Those baby elephants need to have milk every three hours until they grow big enough to survive on the usual food. Since then, they allow the public to watch those feeding sessions a few times a day. The elephant transit home has hundreds of success stories with rehomed wild elephants from 1995. Also, it is known as one of the best animal welfare and rehabilitation centres in the world. You can visit this place during your visit to the Udawalawe National Park and learn about the process of rehoming the injured wild elephants. 

Image of Mother Elephant And Calf
Mother Elephant And Calf | Source:  Anthony Hearsey/Shutterstock.com
Image of Orphaned elephants being feed with milk at the Udawalawe
Orphaned elephants being feed with milk at the Udawalawe | Source:  Gail Palethorpe/Shutterstock.com

3. Udawalawe Reservoir 

Image of Panoramic view of Uda Walawe reservoir
Panoramic view of Uda Walawe reservoir with a mountains on the horizon Udawalawe National Park | Source:  Efimova Anna/Shutterstock.com

The Udawalwe reservoir is playing an essential role in the National Park. It was built by blocking the Walawe river in 1969 as a result of a hydro plant. Now it is supporting both farmers and National Parks by supplying water for irrigation purposes as well. It has the third biggest dam in Sri Lanka, and you can drive along for four kilometres while enjoying the scenic beauty and elephants next to the road. Also, during the dry season, the dam of the reservoir becomes the main viewpoint for elephants in Udawalawe National Park. Mostly when there is less water, elephants spend the evenings in the banks of the lake. As there is a competition for water, it is an excellent chance to see them.  

Image of Lake in Udawalawe National Park Sri Lanka
Lake in Udawalawe National Park Sri Lanka | Source: TellyVision /Dreamstime.com
Image of Blue skies and drowned trees reflected in udawalawe
Blue skies and drowned trees reflected in udawalawe | Source:  EMJAY SMITH/Shutterstock.com

4. Peacocks and Bird Watching

Image of Wild peacock in Uda Walawe National Park
Wild peacock in Uda Walawe National Park | Source:  Matyas Rehak/Shutterstock.com

Peacocks are one of the major attractions of the park. If you visit the early in the morning, you can glimpse peacocks dancing around the banks of the reservoir. Male birds spread their beautiful feathers open to the air as a way of attracting females more often with the sunrise. Especially right after the rains, they get a new set of feathers with more contrast colours to show the prettiness to the females. Since the peacock is a sacred animal in the local communities, you can see hundreds of them even outside the park, as nobody hurts them. Other than peacocks, Udawalawe has around 200 bird species, including the migratory birds from November to March every year. As the park has a few water bodies, you can see a lot of aquatic birds such as teals and storks on the banks. And also, several raptors such as white belied sea eagle, shikra, black-winged kite and hawk eagles are found on the treetops in Udawalawe National Park. Having a good binocular is essential to have a great birding tour in this area as you could quickly tick off more than 200 species in atrip if it a clear day. 

Image of Pair of colorful Little green bee-eater Merops Udawalawe
Pair of colorful Little green bee-eater Merops Udawalawe | Source:  Martin Mecnarowski/Shutterstock.com
Image of Indian peafowl male in Udawalawe National Park
Indian peafowl male in Udawalawe National Park | Source:  feathercollector/Shutterstock.com
Image of Blue Indian Roller on a dead branch sri lanka
Blue Indian Roller on a dead branch sri lanka | Source:  Volodymyr Byrdyak/Dreamstime.com

5. Visit Ella

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| Source:  SJ Travel Photo and Video/Shutterstock.com

Ella is one of the must-visit destinations in Sri Lanka. It is just a two hours drive from Udawalawe, reaching the borders of the hill country. It is suitable for hiking trails, and there are two famous treks. Those are known as Ella rock and mini Adams peak, which are a great way of burning calories while on holiday. Also, next to the mini Adams peak, you can enjoy the most extensive mega zip line in Sri Lanka over the tea plantations. Flying Ravana is an adventure park with abseiling and ATV rides as well. A few tea factories are there close to Ella if you are a tea person and want to see the process of tea making. Also when you are visiting Ella, don’t forget to stop by the famous Ravan falls, which can be seen from the main road. The other most important place to visit is the nine arch bridge in Ella. It is built with bricks with nine arches, giving you the feeling of Hogwarts with a train runs on a bridge. Especially if you are travelling to Kandy, taking the train is the best option. This train line is known as one of the most scenic railway journeys in the world. It gives you the views of misty tea estates and waterfalls in the distance.

6. Visit Maligawila Buddha Statute

Maligawila buddha statue is a magnificent limestone carving from the 7th century. If you are visiting Ella from Udawalwe, it is a must-stop on your way to Wellawaya. You can reach this archaeological site by travelling a few kilometres from Buttala. This statue is the tallest standing Buddha statue that you can see in Sri Lanka at the height of 37 feet 10 inches. It also has a few ruins around the temple area, which was an image house around the statue. This site was discovered in 1951 as a broken statue with a few pieces around the premises. The treasure hunters destroyed it, and in 1991, the government took the necessary actions to build the statue. They could make the statue after repairs and raise back in the middle of the ruins.  The whole area was a complex of a Buddhist temple back in the 7th century. If you could walk around the temple premises, there are another few caves with statues and ruins. In the premises of Maligawila, an inscription says that most of the work was done by a prince called Aggabodhi, while the rest of the buildings are from the king Mahinda IV in the 10th century.